More Colleges Extending Early Application Deadlines

If you're in Hurricane Sandy's projected path, stay safe.

As we prepare for Hurricane Sandy to cross our path, more colleges are extending their early application deadlines in an attempt to soften the storm's impact. Here is a list of schools that have either formally changed their early deadlines or stated that they will be flexible with their existing deadlines:

Boston University
Columbia University
Duke University
George Mason University
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Tufts University
University of Chicago
University of Pennsylvania
University of Virginia
University of Vermont
Villanova University
Yale University

Be prepared so that even if your college does not extend its early deadline, you still submit on time. We've always believed that a problem well organized is a problem half solved, which is why we give students all their essay questions from the very start. Create your free account now so you don't encounter any surprises at the last minute.

 

Washington University in St. Louis Releases its 2012-2013 Application

Washington University is St. Louis has updated its essay questions. The school is a rare case since it has zero required questions, but 24 program-specific questions! Duke University and University of Rochester also released previews of it 2012-2013 essay questions, and the required questions have been updated in College Essay Organizer, and there are many more questions that will be reconfirmed once they are officially released. Overall, we've already got over 160 schools in College Essay Organizer with updated requirements, and we plan to have many more for you next week.

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Ways of Diversifying Your Applications

Gotta diversify... And mix it up... Like a... British Jamaican DJ.

As we've written about before, the cost of diversifying your set of schools is minimal when compared to the potential reward you have in store for an acceptance at a school above your safe range.

Being accepted at a school on the high end of where you're aiming is a big deal in terms of the academic experience you'll have, the success your peers will have after graduation, and the professional expectations you'll have, both in salary and breadth of opportunity.

So how do you expand that list of schools without wasting your time?

Focus on the core priorities you have for your university experience. Selectivity, reputation and ranking, class size, location, setting, etc. Once you've made those decisions, find ways to broaden your selections, and the odds of landing a position will increase.

If you're going to be applying to, say, Cornell, Drexel, Boston College, and UConn, stretch out the list of top schools to three or four, and your chances of winding up at a school like Cornell, even if it's not exactly Cornell - say, Brown, Carnegie Mellon, or Yale - are going to increase.

Remember, there are many reasons you can be denied admission to a school, many of which are outside of your control, such as your demographic, geographic location, or high school's history with the university. Broaden your selection and you'll improve the chances.

CEO is here to compliment the other tools at your disposal and make the many applications, and the legwork that goes along with it, that much easier.

Washington Post: Applicants Apply to Many, Many, Many Schools

Washington Post. Get it? A post? Me neither.

Washington Post. Get it? A post? In Washington? I guess? You have no idea how long we spent looking for an image to put here.

This terrific article over at the Washington Post describes in detail the process that CEO simplifies every day. Top applicants, facing ever-increasing odds against their getting into top schools, diversify their applications and increase the chance they'll land an acceptance from a school at or above their academic level.

Sounds like a plan, right? And why not? There are plenty of horror stories to be had in that article. Perfect SATs. Top grades. Conservatory-level piano skills. A deferral.

But what the Post doesn't address here is that if the process is being made easier and top schools are becoming ever-more selective, what's the downside to applying to more schools?

There isn't one, except for the cost of the applications, which is far outweighed by the potential reward of ending up at a school that brings you up academically, and eventually, professionally and financially.

Take a look at the last line from the article: "I'm feeling it was really smart of me to apply to so many," she said, "because now I have enough options." Speaks for itself.

And with CEO, you can get this work done before that rerun of Seinfeld comes on.

Keep your eye on the ball and you'll see that tools already at your fingertips like CEO make this task easier than ever, often at a very low cost.