Live Webcast Tomorrow - 'Boosting Your SAT/ACT Scores'

Owen Tuleja, ArborBridge Associate Director of Instruction, will present an exclusive webcast to help students understand, study for, and master standardized tests for US colleges.

This webcast will help students identify crucial test-taking strategies, and will guide them through the foundational knowledge they need to succeed. Every student will come away with practical knowledge that will translate directly to point gains. Most importantly, students will come away with the understanding that the SAT and ACT are not difficult exams as long as students are familiar with the material and feel confident in their abilities.

If you attend, you could win a FREE diagnostic exam and analysis!

WHEN: Tuesday, July 22 @ 8pm ET

HOW TO ATTEND: Log into your account and upgrade to ExpertAccess. Use the promo code expert2014 and you'll have access all season long to the nation's leading admissions experts.

Posted in News | Comments Off on Live Webcast Tomorrow - 'Boosting Your SAT/ACT Scores'

Deciding to Take the ACT or the SAT

Which test will you take?

At some point in their high school careers, students usually consider which standardized test to take. Depending on which part of the United States you live in, one may be more popular than the other, but since they are both accepted by colleges, it is a good idea to take each test at least once to see if you have more of a natural gift with one or the other.

This recent article gives a good overview of the ACT including reasons to take the test. And if you are looking for additional services, the ACT may be worth investigating: "ACT Assessment provides a comprehensive package of educational assessment and career planning services for college-bound students at a modest fee that is lower than the fee for the competing admission test."

Posted in News | Comments Off on Deciding to Take the ACT or the SAT

What Can You Expect When You Take the SAT?

Not the most exciting thing to look forward to...

For juniors, spring is the most popular time to take the SAT, followed by another round of testing in the fall if necessary. So as seniors are making their final calculations on which school has the greatest merit, juniors are nose deep in SAT prep books and practice tests.

No matter how much time you have spent preparing, there is always that anticipatory anxiety, and one item on everyone’s mind, as this informative article suggests, is the essay section. The mid-march SAT launched an unexpected essay prompt with a focus on pop culture leaving many with mixed feelings. While some felt it was a step in a positive direction allowing the test to appeal to its teenage audience, others had a quite different reaction:

“There was a hue and cry that the question put some of the best students at a disadvantage because they were often too busy with other, worthier pursuits to be watching Snooki and The Situation. Some students complained they'd been blindsided.”

According to the College Board, which creates and administers the test, the topic was broad enough to encourage good writing, and the essay itself is much less about the topic than it is about the quality of writing. Michael Kuchar, the superintendent of schools and guidance director at Bergenfield High School, states that you can still do well without any knowledge of the topic as long as you follow the right recipe which includes four paragraphs: a thesis, two supporting paragraphs, and a summary which refers back to the question.

As you cram in those last days of study, remember that while there is no way to predict the questions in advance, knowing the formula that the test makers are looking for will give you an advantage.